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Wednesday
Jan022013

For an Interpretive Reading Try a Meditation

For interpretive readings, it can help to select material that lends itself to emotive reading and finding meaning in the silence between the words. Some mediations have been generously converted from the spoken word to on-line articles and books. Here is an excerpt from one called "Enter Into the Season of Truth":

Enter Into the Season of Truth

Following the passage of time
The world, the rivers, the mountains, and I, change.
Before fleeting human life existed,
The world existed,
As did the original world that brought forth the world.
 
 
The original world always just existed,
Just as it is, without change,
From before the beginning and until an eternity afterward,
Regardless of man’s existence.
But man who lives within the years
Passes away with the years.
From ancient times many spoke of life’s transience -
That it is like a drifting cloud,
A floating weed;
That human life truly does not exist.
But no one knew what this meant.

Click to finish reading this meditation

Preparing to read the piece:

  • the easiest way is to convert from its current form to your word processor
  • look for places to pause. If the piece is punctuated, it can help. Sometimes, you need to read it differently from its punctuation.
  • mark your pauses. A common way is to use slashes to indicate the pauses - / (short), // (medium), /// (long)
  • for poetry, you might change where the lines break to make it more readable
  • look for emotion. Emotion is in the vowels, punctuated by consonants. Emotion is in the vowels, punctuated by consonants. Emotion is in the vowels, punctuated by consonants.
  • maximize the amount you look at the audience. Read ahead during the pauses, as much as you can remember, and look at the audience as you finish a line, ideally the most significant part of the line. Do NOT glance up-down for a split second at the end of lines. If you do that, you might as well not look at the audience at all.

Coach Craig

 

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